Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata) – Historical Profile

Written by: Brandon Holden, Alison Kilpatrick, Jonathan Sukhra, Lily Vuong HISTORICAL PROFILE  The history of Kudzu, Pueraria montana var. lobata, started off in eastern Asia in primarily subtropical and temperate regions. The kudzu plant was introduced to the United States from Japan in 1876 at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. The vine was widely marketed … Continue reading Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata) – Historical Profile

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Coyote (Canis latrans)- Management Plan

Written By: Adam Bocskei, Emma Ross, Jesse Beauchamp & Madison Penton MANAGEMENT STRATEGY To construct the most effective management plan, there are some important points to first consider. These include the size and topography of pasture, the intensity of predation, the number and species of livestock, the farmer’s willingness to invest financially, and the public’s … Continue reading Coyote (Canis latrans)- Management Plan

Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata) – Management Plan

Written by:  Brandon Holden, Alison Kilpatrick, Jonathan Sukhra, Lily Vuong Management Plan This plan provides details regarding the integrated management plan to eradicate Kudzu from Leamington Ontario. Due to the isolated nature of the kudzu population in Ontario, the recommended management strategy is prescribed burning followed by physical/mechanical removal. This method is labour-intensive and time … Continue reading Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata) – Management Plan

Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata) – Ecological Profile

Written by: Alison Kilpatrick Distribution: Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata) is a perennial vine native to China, Korea, Japan, India and eastward through the Philippines (Lindgren, Castro, Coiner, Nurse, & Darbyshire, 2013). Populations of Kudzu have been noted outside of its native range in Australia, New Zealand, Italy, Switzerland, South Africa, South America, Mexico, the … Continue reading Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata) – Ecological Profile

Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens glandulifera) – Management Strategy

Written by: Kyra Mckenna, Alex Hristovski, Sabrina Luppino, and Ian Henderson   Management Plan The plan proposed is that of a three pronged approach, where 1) Himalayan Balsam will be placed on the invasive species list preventing it from being spread around by local gardeners. 2) Hand pulling in areas of low densities and 3) replanting … Continue reading Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens glandulifera) – Management Strategy

Grey Wolf – Historical Profile

 Historical Profile The history of the Gray Wolf, Canis lupus, in North America mirror’s it’s history in Europe. The European perspective of wolves arrived with settlers in the 1600’s and 1700’s and initial interactions were not confrontational because both wolves and humans were fearful of each other(Fritts et al., 1997; Stohr, 2012). As time progressed, … Continue reading Grey Wolf – Historical Profile

Coyote (Canis latrans)- Historical Profile

Written by: Adam Bocskei, Emma Ross, Jesse Beauchamp & Madison Penton Historical Profile: The wide distribution of the Coyote, Canis latrans can be attributed to the influence of man on the landscape. The impacts of man have swept North America with deforestation, agriculture and the eradication of apex predators such as Grey Wolves and Cougars … Continue reading Coyote (Canis latrans)- Historical Profile

Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens glandulifera) – Historical Profile

Written by: Kyra Mckenna, Alex Hristovski, Sabrina Luppino, and Ian Henderson Historical Profile While the history of the Himalayan Balsam begins with its origins in the Western and Central Himalayan region (Chandraju, Thejovathi & Chidan, 2012) this plant was brought to our gardens into North America and Europe to make a garden more unique and interesting to … Continue reading Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens glandulifera) – Historical Profile

Sandhill Crane (Antigone canadensis) – Historical Profile

By Sara Kuruvilla, Jennifer Del Tin, Mary-Elizabeth Pennington & Teslyn Heron Historical Profile There are 6 subspecies of Sandhill Cranes including greater, lesser, Cuban, Mississippi, and Canadian (Gerber & Kendall, 2016). The Cuban subspecies does not migrate and is currently considered federally endangered, along with the Mississippi Sandhill Cranes and Florida cranes (United States Fish … Continue reading Sandhill Crane (Antigone canadensis) – Historical Profile